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to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows. -- to present the administration's position. >> main republican senator susan collins after hearing from u.n. ambassador susan rice on capitol hill. she also tried to tie susan rice to the 1998 embassy bombings in kenya and tanzania. now, for a while it looked like senators graham mccain were going to give her past, but then she went up there to talk to these folks. why would she do that, nina? >> i don't know, but they keep moving the bar on her. initially they said did not like what she said, then petraeus said these are the facts we gave her but now a senator collins says she should not have gone on television at all. nobody said that about condoleezza rice when she used to go on sunday talk shows all the time to represent the administration's position, including an election year, and said things that were later proven to be not true that she may not have known that. she probably di
signs point to u.n. ambassador susan rice as the top contender but republicans. >> signs of backing off their opposition whether or not she would survive a nomination fight is anybody's guess. >> don't know whether he should take on fight north. i know this. that what has happened to susan rice is unfair. >> i don't think she will be nominated. but i've told people certainly i will give her a fair hearing. i do think that the underlying issue here is people have seen her far more as a political operative and not a principal. >> jimmy williams joins me now from our d.c. bureau with more on why this fight over rice matters. so it was written in the chicago times hillary clinton preferring john kerry. hilary is not close to rice who is tough but not the friendliest person. hilary's brief comment recently that rice had done a great job was considered underwhelming and tepid. if that's true, jimmy, how does john kerry compare to her personality? >> i think what you're seeing here, this has virtually nothing to do with the next secretary of state. and to think that we just finished the electi
benghazi? the u.n. ambassador has no relation to her qualifications to be secretary of state. and i think the gop has had this really nagging complaint that there was too much information given about the bin laden and reflected too well on the president. they can't. criticize the fact the administration went after and did something the president was able to do and that was hunt down bin laden. i don't think it's justified. and i think it's political grapes. but all of this has been a tremendous distraction from what we e ought to be focused on. where are we in hunt for people who killed our ambassador? and bringing them to justice? in an ordinary course of events, that would be the sole focus. >> let's hope no one is taking their eye off of that. that's the most important thing right now. i want to switch topics with you and go to the fiscal cliff. how much harder does that make it to reach. a deal? >> it really doesn't make it anymore difficult. we're see egg the usual choreography of negotiations where the parties start o out with their opening positions. what the speaker doesn't like i
to talk about susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. possible nominee for secretary of state. this was what senator claire mccaskill said this morning about how she's being treated. i want to play the sound and talk to you guys about it on the other side. take a listen. >> what has happened to susan rice is terribly unfair. if you really understand what went on. it is terribly unfair that she should be the scapegoat for this. when really the failures, ought to be at the lap of the head of the intelligence community that produced those talking points. that none of these guys will say a word about david petraeus. >> susan, do you agree? do you think she's a scapegoat? >> no, i don't. i think she did her job, i don't think her actions are reasons for her not to get the secretary of state job. but at the same time, she's been so politicized and guess what, things in politics aren't fair. politics is not a sport that is played fairly. she's gotten caught up in this. and let's face it after all the talk that we heard this week, john kerry can sail into that and it's not a political
's very hard to say when it is then his regime will collapse. host: the secretary general of the u.n., anders rasmussen, said that "it would be completely unacceptable for the whole international community and if anyone resort to these terrible weapons, i would expect an immediate reaction from the international community." what would that reaction be? guest: military intervention. we have heard very strong warnings. the words of not been directly spelled out, it's likely that is exactly what would need to happen. host: led by the u.s. or another nation? guest: the u.s. would clearly playing a leading role. host: front page of a "the new york times." the story points out the loan syrian rebel group with the stamp of approval from all qaeda has become one of the most effective fighting forces was a stark challenge to the u.s. and other countries. explain. guest: this is a longstanding concern and one reason why the obama administration has said they're not interested in sending sophisticated weapons and to syria. the organization referred to in the article is considered one of the mos
of mali, to our allies, and to our security. the u.n. security council is now considering what they call a concept of operations for an african-led military operation. the u.s. can and should play a more active role in supporting this and preventing the country from becoming a permanent home for extremists and a safe haven for terrorists. an active role, mr. president, does not mean putting american boots on the ground. instead, we can provide operational support for a regionally led, multilateral, african-led force being organized by eco was, the economic community of west african states, and the african union. in the weeks ahead, the u.n. security council will likely vote on a resolution authorizing this coalition to lead a military intervention to dislodge the terrorists in the northern. we've seen models like this wo work, in cote d'ivoire and somalia, so there's reason to believe in the potential of a regional military solution to the security crisis in the north. however, even if this intervention works, it will take time to train and equip and assemble the regional force and to de
to the middle east. good to have you guys, too. >> great to have you here. so baseline recognized by the u.n. what does it mean? >> the palestinians got frustrated by a lack of a process. we have to get that back to a kr credible location. >> and the obama administration is saying what the united nations did unilaterally was a setback. do you agree with that? the body i represent is split. some people are in favor of the u.s. vote. the truth of it, the only thing that will work to deliver a palestinian state side-by-side with a secure state of israel is peace. as you can see we have a chance now. the president has been re-elected. i know he's deeply personally committed to this and we just have to regrip it, i'm afraid. >> what's gone wrong? >> it's partly because there's so much turmoil in the region right now. it's how each side views its own prospects. >> how would you characterize a credible negotiation given the fact as long as we've been alive there's been these problems that keep erupting and never, ever get solved? we've been trying for 20, 30 years. it was 50, 60 years before we got
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7